Joshua

Joshua 12-15

Many of us started this 86 days ago.  EIGHTY-SIX!  (And through some of the hardest to read parts of the Bible)  If you opened your BIble 87 days ago to these chapters many of us would not know who the names were,  where this land is, or why this is important.  So this might not be exciting to read, but it is pretty stinking cool that you could explain the overview of it to someone who has not read a Bible.

So as you read, listen or let’s be transparent…skim a little.  Here is a fun activity for you while doing it.  As you read them,  color them.

Click here to print.

Image result for the land of canaan black and white

Chapters 13—24 describe how Joshua divided the land, and the events following that division, including the settlement of the tribes and national rededication. Many, if not all, of the Israelite tribes, did not conquer or control all the land allotted to them.   At the end of the seven-year period of conquest, Israel occupied very little of the Promised Land. Consequently, dividing all the land among the tribes required great faith, that God would eventually give His people all of it. Joshua (well, the Lord) had removed the significant military threats to Israel’s existence. From now on, each tribe was responsible to conquer its own designated territory.


Tribes on the East side of the Jordan River-(Transjordan Tribes)-  Reuben, Gad, and half of Manasseh.  These tribes requested this land, and Moses approved AS LONG AS they joined the army and fought the battles and then returned to that land.


Eleazar the high priest, Joshua, and the heads of the tribes took the leadership in dividing the portion of the land by “casting lots”.  (The stones the High Priest used to confer with God when a decision was to be made. The stones were called the Urim and Thummim)


Moses had promised Caleb land in Canaan but had not specified its location. The reason for this special blessing was Caleb’s faithfulness to God.  The portion that Caleb requested was within the tribal allotment of Judah.

Caleb was from the tribe of Judah and he was given Hebron.  If you went back to Genesis 23, this was the land that Abraham purchased knowing one day they would claim the land.  He purchases Hebron to be a burial site for his wife.  Actually, Patriarchs: Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and the Matriarchs Sarah, Rebekah, and Leah, are buried there.  Hebron also will become King David’s first capital (before Jerusalem)


The tribe of Judah probably received first consideration in the text, because it was this tribe that had received Jacob’s blessing. It was also the largest tribe.  This part of Canaan contained four distinct regions: the southern
Negev, the lowland plain (Shephelah), the mountains (hill country), and the desert.

  • The “Negev” (“south” land)
  • The “Foothills” (“lowland”)
  • Five groups of cities stood in the mountainous “hill country” of
    Judah, north of the Negev, east of the Shephelah, and west of
    the wilderness of Judah
  • The “wilderness” of Judah was the northeastern part of the
    tribal inheritance.

“Othniel” (put his name in your pocket) later became one of Israel’s prominent judges.  He was Caleb’s younger brother.


To be continued: