Psalm

Psalm 32, 51, 86, and 122,

(If you saw my post this morning I woke up late!) Keeping accountable to you, I finished.  If you don’t feel like reading this, it is fine but skip to the bottom and listen to some music))

Psalm 32 is a Wisdom Psalm.  It is more of a reflection than a prayer or petition.

I really never noticed the -ed after the word ‘bless’ until now.  As a reflection (not a prayer) it makes total sense.  They are not going to be blessed, they are already blessed.

Blessed is the one
    whose transgressions are forgiven,
    whose sins are covered.

 

Psalm 32 and 51 read back to back is incredible (go do it again now)  Psalm 32 talks about the NEED to confess and then 51 is the model for the confession.  In it, David did not utter one word of excuse for the sins he had committed, nor did he minimize his offenses or blame others for what he had done.

Psalm 32

When I kept silent,
    my bones wasted away
    through my groaning all day long.
For day and night
    your hand was heavy on me;
my strength was sapped
    as in the heat of summer.[b]

5 Then I acknowledged my sin to you
    and did not cover up my iniquity.
I said, “I will confess
    my transgressions to the Lord.”
And you forgave
    the guilt of my sin.

Are you acknowledging your sin or confessing/repenting of your sin????


Psalm 51 A Penitential Psalm.  Back on April 22nd I described a set of psalms that were used when repenting.  Click here if you need to go back.

Look at the title of this Psalm:

For the director of music. A psalm of David. When the prophet Nathan came to him after David had committed adultery with Bathsheba.

David confessed the sins he committed against Bathsheba and Uriah. Obviously, he had sinned against Bathsheba, her husband, and the nation that he ruled, but David rightfully admitted that the worst thing he had done was offending God. Taking personal responsibility for our sins is an important part of true confession.

My favorite part was probably one that many of you didn’t choose today (because there are so many good one) Verse 16:

You do not delight in sacrifice, or I would bring it;
    you do not take pleasure in burnt offerings.
 My sacrifice, O God, is a broken spirit;
    a broken and contrite heart
    you, God, will not despise.

I cannot “make up for it” with works.  Trust me I try it all the time!  What God takes pleasure in is the broken heart.  How many times have you heard this:

a voice from my heart.: Break my heart for what breaks Yours.


Psalm 86:  Very cool Psalm that it is a compilation assembled by other parts of the Psalms quoted almost verbatim. (LOL, like when I write Essays when I got my Master’s Degree….just kidding)

is a virtual mosaic of other psalms, and its quotations are almost verbatim.
Verses in Psalm 86 Similar verses elsewhere
Verse 1: from Ps. 17:6; 31:2; 35:10; 37:14; and 40:17
Verse 2:  from Ps. 25:20
Verse 3: from Ps. 57:1-2
Verse 5: from Exod. 34:6
Verse 6: from Ps. 28:2
Verse 7: from Ps. 17:6; and 77:2
Verse 8: from Ps. 35:10; 71:19; 89:6; Exod. 8:10; 9:14; and 15:11
Verse 10: from  Ps. 72:18; and 77:13-14
Verse 11: from Ps. 27:11
Verse12-13: from Ps. 50:15, 23; 56:13; and 57:9-10
Verse16: from Ps. 25:16


Psalm 122: A song of ascents. You have to picture it.  Walking uphill, to Jerusalem for a festival or to worship and this song is being sung.  During this Covid-19 shutdown, have we even stopped to consider what it would be like if we lost the privilege of gathering as a group in church forever? Do we take for granted the privilege we have to meet as a group?

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:
    “May those who love you be secure.
 May there be peace within your walls
    and security within your citadels.”
 For the sake of my family and friends,
    I will say, “Peace be within you.”


I know this isn’t typical worship music, but listen to the words of this song today as you finish your reading: The song starts at 1:45 (you can skip to that)

 

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