1 Kings · 2 Chronicles · Psalm

1 Kings 3-4, 2 Chronicles and Psalm 72

Before we read:

  • Exodus 34:15-16 “Be careful not to make a treaty with those who live in the land; for when they prostitute themselves to their gods and sacrifice to them, they will invite you and you will eat their sacrifices.  And when you choose some of their daughters as wives for your sons and those daughters prostitute themselves to their gods, they will lead your sons to do the same.”
  • Deuteronomy 17:17  He must not take many wives, or his heart will be led astray. He must not accumulate large amounts of silver and gold.
  • Deuteronomy 12:13-14 Be careful not to sacrifice your burnt offerings anywhere you please. Offer them only at the place the Lord will choose in one of your tribes, and there observe everything I command you.

Chapter 3

Verse 1: “Solomon made an alliance with Pharaoh king of Egypt and married his daughter. He brought her to the City of David until he finished building his palace and the temple of the Lord, and the wall around Jerusalem. The people, however, were still sacrificing at the high places, because a temple had not yet been built for the Name of the Lord. Solomon showed his love for the Lord by walking according to the instructions given him by his father David, except that he offered sacrifices and burned incense on the high places.

Chapter 3 begins immediately with the scripture that will eventually be Solomon’s ultimate downfall.  Marriage between royal families was a common practice in the ancient Middle East because it secured peace.  His MANY marriages opened the door to pagan ideas and practices.  Solomon’s foreign wives brought their gods to Jerusalem which led to idolatry.

Solomon loved God, but sacrificing outside the Tabernacle was forbidden.   It took the offerings out of the careful practices of the priesthood and opened the door for false teaching.

(Cool fact: 40 kings will be mentioned in 1 and 2 Kings, and Solomon is the only one in scripture that says he loved the Lord)❤


This is was so cool I thought I would share:

In 1928 a Syrian farmer found the first of many tablets in his field.  He uncovered the Ras Shamra tablets. These tablets described Canaanite religious practices “in high places” of child sacrifice (lining up with the exact description from the Bible).  Other cultural practices mentioned in the Bible such as Levirate marriage (Gen 38:8; Deut 25:5-6), were also described in the Ras Shamra tablets.  A small fragment of one of the tablets contained an account of the flood story. Findings like this supports the reliability of the Bible.


Next:

God said, “Ask for whatever you want me to give you.”

Solomon said, “So give your servant a discerning heart to govern your people and to distinguish between right and wrong. For who is able to govern this great people of yours?”

His words show that he viewed himself as dependent on God, not self-sufficient.

(A few key words are underlined)

10 The Lord was pleased that Solomon had asked for this. 11 So God said to him, “Since you have asked for this and not for long life or wealth for yourself, nor have asked for the death of your enemies but for discernment in administering justice, 12 I will do what you have asked. I will give you a wise and discerning heart, so that there will never have been anyone like you, nor will there ever be. 13 Moreover, I will give you what you have not asked for—both wealth and honor—so that in your lifetime you will have no equal among kings. 14 And if you walk in obedience to me and keep my decrees and commands as David your father did, I will give you a long life.” 

(Darn!  as soon as I see an “if”, I know it’s not going to go as planned!)


One of Solomon’s first acts in the Bible to use his Wisdom was “The Wise Ruling” incident:


Chapter 4- Continuing with wise decision, Solomon organizes Officials and Governors to maintain government effectiveness.  He was wiser than the men from the East (Egypt) who were known for their wisdom.  The men that were named: Heman, Kalkol, and Darda are from the tribe of Judah (mentioned in 1 Chron 2:6)


2 Chronicles 1:   It is not what this book says, but what it does NOT say.

  1. What is missing?
  2. Why is it missing?

Psalm 72- This is categorized as a Royal Psalm so here is my question…when you read Psalm 72, did you read is as:

  1. David writing it, and praying it over his son Solomon?
  2. Solomon, wanting/needing Wisdom from the Lord?
  3. Did you read it as they were referring to the Messiah?

(There is no right or wrong answer)

3 thoughts on “1 Kings 3-4, 2 Chronicles and Psalm 72

  1. It didn’t mention Solomon marrying the Pharaohs daughter. I think it wasn’t mentioned because it was one of things they weren’t supposed to do and Chronicles focused on the good/right things.
    I read the Psalm as Solomon asking for wisdom until I got to the last verse that said it concluded the prayers of David so then I was a little confused lol

    Like

    1. Becky, how cool is it that you can pick up on the Chronicler’s purpose of writing 🙂 That’s something you can teach to others and their head will explode.

      Like

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